Heat Warning

With heat warnings in our area, a warning for pets owners to take care of your animals comes as well.

In the heat, that warning means even more for certain breeds of cats and dogs.

Short-nosed dogs like Pugs, Pekinese, Bulldog, Shih Tzu, Boston Terrier, Boxer, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and French bulldogs can overheat more easily because of those short snouts.

Pepper

Body temperature may be elevated because of an infection (fever), but it may also increase because of hot and/or humid conditions outside.  An increased body temperature caused by environmental conditions is commonly referred to as hyperthermia, heatstroke, and heat prostration.

Hyperthermia may be a life-threatening condition, and does require immediate treatment.  A dog’s normal body temperature is 101.5°F plus or minus 1 degree Fahrenheit, and any time the body temperature is higher than 105°F, a true emergency exists.  Heatstroke generally occurs in hot summer weather when dogs are left with inadequate ventilation in hot vehicles.  However, heatstroke may also occur in other conditions, including:

  1. When an animal is left outdoors in hot/humid conditions without adequate shade.
  2. When exercised in hot/humid weather.
  3. When left in a car on a relatively cool (70°F) day; a recent study from Stanford University Medical Center found the temperature within a vehicle may increase by an average of 40 degrees Fahrenheit within one (!) hour regardless of outside temperature.

Other predisposing factors may be obesity and/or diseases affecting a pet’s airway.  Keep in mind that prolonged seizures, eclampsia (milk fever), poisonings, and many other conditions may cause hyperthermia.  Also, brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds (Pekingese, Pug, Lhasa apso, Boston terrier, etc.) may suffer from ineffectual panter syndrome that results in an increased body temperature that may be fatal.

Initially the pet appears distressed, and will pant excessively and become restless.  As the hyperthermia progresses, the pet may drool large amounts of saliva from the nose and/or mouth.  The pet may become unsteady on his feet.  You may notice the gums turning blue/purple or bright red in color, which is due to inadequate oxygen.

What to Do

  • Remove your pet from the environment where the hyperthermia occurred.
  • Move your pet to shaded and cool environment, and direct a fan on her.
  • If possible, determine rectal temperature and record it.
  • Begin to cool the body by placing cool, wet towels over the back of the neck, in the armpits, and in the groin region.  You may also wet the ear flaps and paws with cool water.  Directing a fan on these wetted areas will help to speed evaporative cooling.  Transport to the closest veterinary facility immediately.

What NOT to Do

  • Do not overcool the pet.
  • Most pets with hyperthermia have body temperatures greater than 105°F, and a reasonable goal of cooling is to reduce your pet’s body temperature to 102.5-103°F while transporting her to the closest veterinary facility.
  • Do not attempt to force water into your pet’s mouth, but you may have fresh cool water ready to offer should your pet be alert and show an interest in drinking.
  • Do not leave your pet unattended for any length of time.

Rapidly cooling the pet is extremely important. Cold tap water is suitable.

Severe hyperthermia is a disease that affects nearly every system in the body. Simply lowering the body temperature fails to address the potentially catastrophic events that often accompany this disorder. A pet suffering from hyperthermia should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible.


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COVID-19 Message to our Clients

To Our Valued Clients,

Our top priority is to provide exceptional care to our patients while safeguarding our staff and our community.  We continue to maintain our regular business hours and we are available to see you and your pets for essential veterinary health care services.

We have been monitoring the COVID-19 situation closely and want to notify you of changes we are making at for the welfare of our staff, clients and patients. We have taken great care to implement safeguards to help reduce the spread of this virus.

Amended Procedures:

  • The doors to the hospital will be closed to the public
  • Visitors to the hospital must remain outside the hospital. This includes walk-ins, appointments and food/prescription purchases.
  • We will not be performing fit-n-fury, birthday exams, nail trims, routine dentals and non-essential surgeries until further advised.
  • We will no longer accept cash or in-person payment.

https://hollybankanimalhospital.ca/online-payments

https://avonleaanimalhospital.ca/online-payments

Admittance:

  • A copy of our admittance and discharge instructions and patient history forms will be sent to you prior to the scheduled appointment.
  • Please remain in your vehicle and call us when you arrive in the parking lot.
  • We will assess your Covid-19 risk using the "patient screening pathway”.
  • When we are ready, we will motion for you to bring your pet from your vehicle to the clinic door. All dogs must be on leash and cats must be in carriers.
  • The veterinarian will call at the end of the examination or video conference you during the examination to discuss examination findings and recommendations.

Discharge:

  • You will be emailed a copy of the invoice including home notes.
  • Payment will be taken over the phone, via Interac e-Transfer, or online.
  • Any medication or items to be picked up will be given in a plastic bag at the time of discharge.
  • We will call you when we are ready for discharge at which time you will collect your pet outside of the clinic.

Food, inventory and medication pickup:

  • All items can be ordered over the phone or purchased using our online shop https://shop.avonleaanimalhospital.ca
  • For pickup, we will bring the items to you outside the clinic.

Product availability:

We have been in constant contact with the suppliers and manufacturers responsible for ensuring our hospitals have sufficient supply of veterinary diets and over the counter products, and we do not anticipate any disruption to this supply. However, instances of buying large quantities of these products have strained the supply chain. We respectfully request that our clients limit their purchases of these products to immediate need plus one month’s supply to ensure all clients and patients have access to these products.

Our goal is to keep our essential services available to the communities we serve and to be there for you and your pets. Thank you for your cooperation and for doing your part in helping to keep pets and people safe. Please do not hesitate to call with questions. We anticipate our phone lines will be busier than usual and we thank you in advance for your patience!

Our new hours of operation are as follows:

  • Monday: 9a-7p
  • Tuesday: 9a-7p
  • Wednesday: 9a-7p
  • Thursday: 9a-7p
  • Friday: 9a-7p
  • Saturday: 9a-3p
  • Sunday: closed

Call us if you have questions or need to schedule an appointment.